All Saints' Anglican Church, Rome
A growing Christian community in the heart of Rome finding and following Jesus in worship,
fellowship, study and service.
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Listen to some organ music, played by Titular Organist, Gabriele Catalucci Listen to some organ music, played by Titular Organist, Gabriele Catalucci

Walk Round Tour

Memorials

Memorials abound at All Saints' and will contain greatly varying interest to a modern Visitor. We will single out only a few - once again beginning in the south aisle, but this time further away from the pulpit.

A quite recent marble tablet here honours a former chaplain of All Saints' (1949 - 1956)

Canon John Findlow. At the foot of the monument you may read the richly deserved tribute paid by the then Archbishop of Canterbury after this priests early death in 1970.

After a spell in other chaplaincies (Montreux and Athens) Canon Findlow was brought back to Rome in 1966 to establish the unique and newly created ANGLICAN CENTRE IN ROME, at Piazza Collegio Romano 2,7. This is housed in the Palazzo Doria, and its function does not conflict with the pastoral nature of the Anglican chaplaincies of All Saints' and St. Paul's. Under a resident director, in Anglican orders, the Centre houses a large library of Anglican authors and books of reference and history dealing with the whole Anglican Communion. Students of any age, and, it is intended, particularly for those who are Roman Catholic, who wish may to come to learn about our communion and be given guidance for research for essays or theses. The director is the personal link between the Archbishop of Canterbury and the Pope. Visitors are welcome, not least because they can help make the centre better known. It is advisable to telephone first, during office hours, to 06 678 0302. In high summer many Roman institutions observe revised hours and /or have a lengthy closure. The Anglican Centre was a fruit - and a very substantial one - of the formal visit paid by Archbishop Michael Ramsey to Pope Paul IV in 1966. Mutual expressions of warmth continued the thaw in relations between Canterbury and Rome.

Credit for first breaking the ice must, however, go to the previous Archbishop of Canterbury, Geoffrey Fisher. All Saints' very properly has a memorial plaque to his courage and initiative and diplomacy, and you can find this fixed to the pillar nearest to the porch, when you have crossed passed the font.

Flanking the font on either side, two Second World War tablets record the sorrow and the joy, which were inseparable from each other in the liberation of Rome in1944.

On the right may be seen the memorial to the First British Division who gave their lives in the battles of the Anzio Beachhead and the liberation of Rome.

On the left, another tablet commemorates the entry of the allied Armies into Rome on the 5th June 1944.

"AND THE LIBERATION AND PRESERVATION OF THE CITY AND OF THIS CHURCH, WHEREIN A SERVICE OF THANKSGIVING WAS HELD."

The story of how All Saints' was preserved intact, and in a state that allowed, so soon after the Liberation, a service to be held, is related in the companion history. Huge numbers used the building, as a garrison church, as soon as it was opened, and its post-war life got off to a flying start.

One more tablet is of strong Anglo - Italian interest, though it takes us back much further, and into a more guerrilla - like campaign.

On the wall of the north Aisle, not far from the chapel entrance, look for a brass tablet, which bears these words:

TO THE GLORY OF GOD
AND TO THE MEMORY OF THE LATE
LT. COL. BARON J.W.KEEN,
AND OF HIS BRAVE COMRADES IN ARMS OF THE
BRITISH LEGION WHO FOUGHT
WITH GARIBALDI IN ITALY'S STRUGGLE FOR
FREEDOM DURING THE CAMPAIGN IN 1860.

The "British Legion" was not, of course, the Royal British Legion of this century, but a corps of men recruited in Britain whose sympathies for Garibaldi stirred them to come and fight with his supporters in the struggle for the unification of Italy. This was achieved in 1870: or rather, the taking of Rome that year marked the beginning of the long process of forging one nation out of several.

In 1920, at a much delayed ceremony thanks to another intervening war, Signora Garibaldi, daughter-in-law of the patriotic Giuseppe, was present to unveil the Keen tablet, and she had the support of a few living "Redshirts" wearing their old uniform. This woman born Constance Hopcraft, had the distinction of witnessing both the laying of the foundation stone of All Saints' in 1882 and the blessing of the cross before it was hauled to the top of the new spire in 1937. No wonder we find her treated with respect for so many years in the account books of the church, where she was, year after year, to have seats at All Saints' at a rent "Specially agreed" by the church committee. The deaths of two spinster daughters, as recently as 1958 and 1962, and both given Anglican funerals, finally broke the long connection between the Garibaldians and our church.

A little farther along the same wall, you may see the marble tablet in memory of

HARRY WALSTANE DE NANCREDE
CANON OF GIBRALTAR
HON. ASSISTANT CHAPLAIN
OF ALL SAINTS' ROME
1892 - 1937

This is simply recorded no less than 45 years' unpaid priestly assistance under nine stipendiary chaplains, an alongside a great many temporary assistant clergy who came and went. He was ordained in the United States Episcopal Church (Anglican, of course); but chose to live in a hotel in Rome and exercise his ministry here. In 1932, the completion of forty years' loving service was marked by the presentation of a generous testimonial to the Canon from the congregation, "to be spent on himself". He went to Venice and used the money to buy the seven hanging lamps, which adorn the sanctuary in front of the high altar; and defrayed the whole cost of installing them.

He remained active in taking services until not long before his death at 85.

You are at the entrance of a part of the church which besides housing memorial gifts, deserves to be understood as a whole.


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